Parents, why we need to be praying for our children more than ever

This week, another American flag has been lowered to half-staff. Another mass school shooting has hit our land, where two students were killed and 18 injured by a 15-year-old male student with a handgun in Benton, Kentucky not far from Nashville. This tragedy comes shortly after the recent Texas and Louisiana school shootings. Our nation has experienced 13 mass shootings this year. Even though the news headlines now seem quiet, the hurt and pain are still greater than ever in that small Kentucky town.

My heart sinks as a parent with two children in school and two preschool-aged children soon to make their way through elementary doors. In light of recent news, I’m reminded more than ever about the spiritual battle at hand and how desperately our children need our prayers each and every day.

Ephesians 6:12 says that “Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”

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Parents, we are not fighting a battle that is merely flesh and blood, but a spiritual one. We’d be foolish to think we can fight the battles that are upon our children today with merely physical armor. These battles can only be fought spiritually through our prayers.

In prayer, we plead with Jesus to bring refreshing rains of healing and restoration to our nation again– to the hearts of families that desperately need a Savior. On our knees, we cover our children in God’s protection, love, and security. In calling on our Redeemer, we humble ourselves and turn to the One who is able to do far more than we’re capable of with our finite hands.

Parents, we have the tremendous privilege, by the shed blood of Jesus, to regularly go to the throne of grace in confidence that God will hear us when we cry out to Him. May the healing in our land that we long for first start with us. And even if our prayers are broken and our words are stuttering, make no mistake, that is still a beautiful thing.

If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” (2 Chronicles 7:14)

Wake us up from our spiritual slumber, oh God. Forgive us for our apathy and transform us into praying parents who are on the battle lines, engaged in the war at hand not idle to the enemies tactics.

“Wake up, sleeper, rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.” – Ephesians 5:14

Raise up people who will lead prayer groups inside the walls of our schools, in our churches, communities, and all over our nation. Raise up people who will mentor hurting children and who will love children living in broken homes who need to know how accepted and loved they are by our heavenly Father. Raise up teachers, administration, and students who are serious about following you. Help us to listen to you if we are to be that leader in our community.

Dear God, raise up a generation who will not turn to guns but to the Word of God for their ultimate hope and rescue. May we as parents allow the gospel to pierce the darkness and bring its saving light. Turn our hearts to seek you first and fill our schools with joy, peace, love, kindness, and hope once again. In your name, we pray, Amen.

Learn biblical principles for raising children from Kirk and Chelsea Cameron in THE HEART OF FAMILY. Watch the trailer here. 


Samantha Krieger is a pastor’s wife, mother to four, and writer in rural Colorado. She’s the author of Quiet Time: A 30-day Devotional Retreat for Moms in the Trenches. To read more from Samantha, visit her blog: www.samanthakrieger.com


 

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